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30-Dec-2016 23:22

A PBS prescription written by a dentist, an optometrist, a midwife or a nurse practitioner must include the person's approval number as a PBS prescriber.

PBS prescriptions should be provided to the patient in duplicate, as both parts make up a valid PBS prescription.

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Note, only Release 2 enabled pharmacy systems will be capable of retrieving an electronic prescription.

However, if a registered practitioner issues multiple schedule II prescriptions, he /she is limited to the combined effect of allowing a patient to receive, over time, up to a 90-day supply of a particular schedule II controlled substance. The rule does not stipulate how many separate prescriptions per schedule II controlled substance may be issued for the 90-day supply.Acute prescriptions and those which arise from face to face consultations default to ‘immediate’, as the patient is then more likely to be going directly to a pharmacy.Prescriptions that are issued where the patient is not present, for example repeat prescriptions, should normally be classified as ‘routine’.There are a number of reasons why a prescription may not be found on the system, for example, the prescription may have been removed under the EPS housekeeping rules or the prescription may not have arrived at the Spine.All messages sent via the EPS service are classified as ‘immediate’ or ‘routine’.

However, if a registered practitioner issues multiple schedule II prescriptions, he /she is limited to the combined effect of allowing a patient to receive, over time, up to a 90-day supply of a particular schedule II controlled substance. The rule does not stipulate how many separate prescriptions per schedule II controlled substance may be issued for the 90-day supply.

Acute prescriptions and those which arise from face to face consultations default to ‘immediate’, as the patient is then more likely to be going directly to a pharmacy.

Prescriptions that are issued where the patient is not present, for example repeat prescriptions, should normally be classified as ‘routine’.

There are a number of reasons why a prescription may not be found on the system, for example, the prescription may have been removed under the EPS housekeeping rules or the prescription may not have arrived at the Spine.

All messages sent via the EPS service are classified as ‘immediate’ or ‘routine’.

It is up to the practitioner to determine how many separate prescriptions to be filled sequentially are needed to provide adequate medical care.