Dating shell gorget

19-Jan-2017 01:45

Some motifs were gender specific while others were used to relate family ties.

Designs often explained important fables, tales and stories of the Chickasaw.

These artifacts are now known to date to the Mississippian period beginning about AD 1000 in the southeast.

In fact, the gorget shown in Figure 1 or similar ones over the years have been illustrated in descriptions of the Mississippian period and southeastern prehistory (Hudson 191; Power 207; Willey 195). 1968 The Southeastern Ceremonial Complex and Its Interpretation.

Necklaces and throat collars hold a special place in the heart of the Chickasaw people. For special occasions or religious ceremonies, a person would wear their finest regalia. Shell necklaces, especially ocean shells, and copper were reserved for high ranking people.” European explorers of the 18th century took notice of gourd necklaces worn by the Chickasaw people. The materials used and motifs depicted on the gorget reflected a person’s status within the tribe.Among examples he illustrated is one in the National Museum of Natural History collection shown in Figure 1. Jackson, Jerome 2004 The Hunt for the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker. Unfortunately the image lacks details to definitively identify which species was the model. The timestamp is only as accurate as the clock in the camera, and it may be completely wrong.For centuries, Chickasaws have been known for their sense of style and panache. Gourds, fresh water shells, ocean shells, mollusks, stone and copper were used to make gorgets.

Necklaces and throat collars hold a special place in the heart of the Chickasaw people. For special occasions or religious ceremonies, a person would wear their finest regalia. Shell necklaces, especially ocean shells, and copper were reserved for high ranking people.” European explorers of the 18th century took notice of gourd necklaces worn by the Chickasaw people. The materials used and motifs depicted on the gorget reflected a person’s status within the tribe.

Among examples he illustrated is one in the National Museum of Natural History collection shown in Figure 1. Jackson, Jerome 2004 The Hunt for the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker.

Unfortunately the image lacks details to definitively identify which species was the model.

The timestamp is only as accurate as the clock in the camera, and it may be completely wrong.

For centuries, Chickasaws have been known for their sense of style and panache. Gourds, fresh water shells, ocean shells, mollusks, stone and copper were used to make gorgets.

They are believed to have been insignia of status or rank, The gorget forms a concave shape and, when engraved, the interior is polished and decorated.