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29-Aug-2016 19:08

This decay is an example of an exponential decay, shown in the figure below.Knowing about half-lives is important because it enables you to determine when a sample of radioactive material is safe to handle.This has to do with figuring out the age of ancient things.If you could watch a single atom of a radioactive isotope, U-238, for example, you wouldn’t be able to predict when that particular atom might decay.

Question: "How does radiometric dating fit with the view of a young earth?

It then takes the same amount of time for half the remaining radioactive atoms to decay, and the same amount of time for half of those remaining radioactive atoms to decay, and so on. The amount of time it takes for one-half of a sample to decay is called the half-life of the isotope, and it’s given the symbol: It’s important to realize that the half-life decay of radioactive isotopes is not linear.

For example, you can’t find the remaining amount of an isotope as 7.5 half-lives by finding the midpoint between 7 and 8 half-lives.

Use the links below to explore available resources covering major concepts associated with the study of the history of the Earth.

Resources in this section pertain to the formation and evolution of the Earth and how it has been discovered through the relative and absolute dating of rocks and fossils.

Question: "How does radiometric dating fit with the view of a young earth?

It then takes the same amount of time for half the remaining radioactive atoms to decay, and the same amount of time for half of those remaining radioactive atoms to decay, and so on. The amount of time it takes for one-half of a sample to decay is called the half-life of the isotope, and it’s given the symbol: It’s important to realize that the half-life decay of radioactive isotopes is not linear.

For example, you can’t find the remaining amount of an isotope as 7.5 half-lives by finding the midpoint between 7 and 8 half-lives.

Use the links below to explore available resources covering major concepts associated with the study of the history of the Earth.

Resources in this section pertain to the formation and evolution of the Earth and how it has been discovered through the relative and absolute dating of rocks and fossils.

Ar (argon), the atom typically remains trapped within the lattice because it is larger than the spaces between the other atoms in a mineral crystal.