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08-Dec-2016 12:09

Have you been discharged from the hospital and need in-home support?

Experiencing a life transition and feeling overwhelmed about what to do next?

Openhouse is committed to serving all participants, and their caregivers and family members, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion, national origin, immigration status, mental or physical ability, ancestry, military discharge status, marital status, source of income, housing status or other protected classification.“As a clinical social worker working in the LGBT senior community, I have heard my share of ageist comments.

The most common reply I hear when I tell peers (I’m 38) what I do for work is, “Aw, how cute.” (Insert eye roll here.) Though dubbing older adults “cute” implies endearment, it’s more than irksome, and requires more than an eye roll to address.

“Older adults think the benefits of social technology greatly outweigh the costs and challenges of technology,” said Chopik, assistant professor of psychology.

That day, Donna’s roommate told staff that she heard “sexual” noises coming from Donna’s side of the room.

But Chopik’s findings challenge this interpretation. More than 95 percent of participants said they were either “somewhat” or “very” satisfied with technology, while 72 percent said they were not opposed to learning new technologies.

“Despite the attention that the digital divide has garnered in recent years, a large proportion of older adults use technology to maintain their social networks and make their lives easier,” Chopik said.

On April 22, a jury acquitted Henry Rayhons, a 78-year-old house representative in Iowa, of felony charges that he had sexually assaulted his wife, Donna Rayhons, who had Alzheimer’s and lived in a nursing home.

The case, widely publicized and held up as emblematic of the problems with consent laws and patients with dementia, has a tragic backstory. Then, Donna was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and became difficult to care for at home.

That day, Donna’s roommate told staff that she heard “sexual” noises coming from Donna’s side of the room.

But Chopik’s findings challenge this interpretation. More than 95 percent of participants said they were either “somewhat” or “very” satisfied with technology, while 72 percent said they were not opposed to learning new technologies.

“Despite the attention that the digital divide has garnered in recent years, a large proportion of older adults use technology to maintain their social networks and make their lives easier,” Chopik said.

On April 22, a jury acquitted Henry Rayhons, a 78-year-old house representative in Iowa, of felony charges that he had sexually assaulted his wife, Donna Rayhons, who had Alzheimer’s and lived in a nursing home.

The case, widely publicized and held up as emblematic of the problems with consent laws and patients with dementia, has a tragic backstory. Then, Donna was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s and became difficult to care for at home.

(Donna died in August of last year, one week before Rayhons’ arrest.)There was no physical evidence of any kind of intercourse, says Joel Yunek, Rayhons’ attorney.