Dhcp not updating in dns

09-Aug-2017 17:17

each question on it's own would have a correct answer, but may not mesh, i'm trying to look for solution to both problems that works together.

If you want internal fake domains to work you can't configure your workstations with any DNS servers except your own.

Then I tried the diagnostic tool link that popped up in the webpage, which showed me DNS Server Not Responding Error.

After performing some troubleshooting, I was able to fix the issue. Sometimes the problem might be as simple as shutting down and turning on modem/ router.

I was just about to post an article on a different topic, but then I noticed that for some reasons, some websites were not opening up.

Motivation In today's dynamic R&D network environments, it's not easy to keep the DNS records up-to-date: hosts are reinstalled/renamed/added frequently, virtual machines are so easy to deploy and destroy, DHCP allocates different IPs..

The great thing, is that it even works out-of-the-box on some operating systems.

Still, if it doesn't, here are 3 things to care about, so to enable this feature: Note that generally this is not considered a secure setting, and it could be hardened by using key-based authentication, which I won't cover here. I'm curious about the security aspect of this model.

The way I see it, bad guys could use this to overwrite popular domain names in the DNS, if they are allowed to send DHCP requests to the same DHCP server (e.g.

This topic is intended to address a specific issue identified by a Best Practices Analyzer scan.

Motivation In today's dynamic R&D network environments, it's not easy to keep the DNS records up-to-date: hosts are reinstalled/renamed/added frequently, virtual machines are so easy to deploy and destroy, DHCP allocates different IPs..

The great thing, is that it even works out-of-the-box on some operating systems.

Still, if it doesn't, here are 3 things to care about, so to enable this feature: Note that generally this is not considered a secure setting, and it could be hardened by using key-based authentication, which I won't cover here. I'm curious about the security aspect of this model.

The way I see it, bad guys could use this to overwrite popular domain names in the DNS, if they are allowed to send DHCP requests to the same DHCP server (e.g.

This topic is intended to address a specific issue identified by a Best Practices Analyzer scan.

I used to have a business line with a static IP, and run bind/named internally. My ISP's DNS servers are constantly changing (for whatever reasons my ISP doesn't like to keep the same IP range for long).